This entry is part 4 of 4 in the series Commanding the Fallen

By Gibson aka KaipaLin

Hey everyone! Welcome to the final installment of Commanding the Fallen, wherein we wrap up our Ravnican excursion with a look at the Ink-Treader Nephilim’s more aggressive capabilities. Last time, we covered a series of more defensive and utilitarian card categories to help us set up big, splashy plays and keep our delicate life total intact along the way. If you’re still wondering why we’re using the technically non-legendary Nephilim as generals, feel free to check out any of the other  articles for reasoning as to why we should invite this gentlething here to head up our army:

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This entry is part 3 of 4 in the series Commanding the Fallen
By Gibson aka KaipaLin

Hey there! Welcome back to our lofty peak, from whence we gaze upon the fifth and final Fallen, the Ink-Treader Nephilim. This guy/gal/Lovecraftian-tentacle-horror has been making some big-time splashes as the head of my very own Nephilim deck- which, I suppose, is to be expected, given all that ink it’s treading through.
As you may have already realized, the Ink-Treader falls in a weird place for an EDH general- namely, it’s not actually legendary. Thank goodness, then, that we’re playing a casual format where rules are mutable and based on consensus decisions of the local players! The shadowy cabal of the Rules Committee notwithstanding, the final arbiters will always be the people across the table, so the first rule of playing with a Nephilim is that your opponents agree to your shenanigans. “And how might I engender such agreement,” you ask? Well, why not:
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This entry is part 2 of 4 in the series Commanding the Fallen
By Gibson aka KaipaLin
 
Hello and welcome to the Nephilim edition of Newbie week here on CommanderCast! If you’re just joining us, or are perhaps new to this wonderful format, you might wonder what Nephilim have to do with EDH. After all, they aren’t legendary, so why should we care? In this article, I’m going to try to emphasize three points for the newer player, and the answer to the previous question is the first point: we care, because in EDH, you can do whatever you want.This is the biggest concept to internalize when first getting into the format; as a casual, multiplayer, non-sanctioned format, the “rules” are only as solid as you and your compatriots want them to be. It’s not up to some shadowy overarching committee issuing decrees from above, it’s about you and your friends, and what you want to do with the format. As for me, I love the color pie and was greatly saddened by the dearth of options for four-color Commanders. In fact, the Nephilim cycle from Guildpact is the only set of four-colored cards in the entirety of Magic’s vast library. Given that they do some very Commander-ly things (they’re mechanically quite unique, have interesting color combinations, can be profitably built-around, and are supposed to be unique creatures in the Ravnica storyline), my group made the decision to go ahead and allow them as generals, and thus, this article series was born. Note here my repeated emphasis on consensus and the group- you can only create an environment everyone will enjoy if everyone has a voice in creating it. So if your peeps refuse to allow Nephilim as generals, be gracious and pack up the idea for a later date; perhaps they’ll change their tune down the road.

My preferred strategy for convincing others to let me try out unconventional things like a Nephilim general is to make that choice central to the logic of the deck; in other words, to build around it. As both an avid Vorthos and Melvin, I appreciate decks that center flavorfully and mechanically around their general. So how does that apply to this week’s headless, cyclopean, bizarrely-appendaged monstrosity?

This entry is part 1 of 4 in the series Commanding the Fallen

By Gibson aka KaipaLin

Hey everybody! If you’re just joining us, this is the third article in a series about the Nephilim, that cycle of bizarrely-limbed four-color monsters from Ravnica who really ought be legendary.

Given that they’re not actually legendary, but are definitely interesting and unique, we’re exercising our house-rule muscles and issuing the decree (with the consent of our gaming compatriots) that henceforth they shall be treated as legendary, with all the rights and responsibilities pursuant to their station. Of course, you may have trouble eliciting that consent, and since no player is an island (except blue mages, and who likes them?), you’re going to have to give a strong case as to why your unusual choice should be allowed. My favored tactic is to impress upon your fellow players how cool the deck is going to be: focus on building an interesting, unique deck, based around your Nephilim’s color identity and flavor (for Vorthos) and/or what it does mechanically (for Melvin). If you can incorporate both and construct your pitch to appeal to your fellow players, you should have relatively little trouble convincing them to let you take your wacky new deck out for a spin.

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